Interview Tips to Help You Land the Job

Finding a job is a journey, full of obstacles and mental taxations. Between researching opportunities, fine tuning your resume and writing the perfect cover letter, job searching can fell like a full-time job in itself.

But eventually, all your hard work will pay off, your resume will get noticed and a face-to-face interview will be scheduled.

In order to shine during the interview, careful preparation beforehand is essential. Here are some tips to help you nail the interview and land the job!

 

Do Your Research

You should thoroughly research the company you are interviewing with, as you want to make sure you understand the business and anticipate the kinds of questions the interviewer may ask. Do a Google search of the company or review the company’s website, including their “About Us” or “Product” pages. If the company has a blog or press articles, be sure to read a few posts. Check their LinkedIn and social media post as well.

You should walk into the interview confident that you have a collective amount of knowledge on the company and your future position.

Ask the Right Questions

The questions you ask are just as important as the answers you give to the interviewer. Here are some examples of questions to ask that will make you come across as intelligent and prepared:

  • What qualities are you looking for in an ideal candidate?
  • Can you describe the team I’d be working with?
  • What would my typical work day be like?’
  • How does this job fit into the overall mission of the company?
  • How would you define success in this position?
  • What would like to see accomplished in the first (month, 6 months, year)?

These question will highlight your enthusiasm, curiosity and leadership skills while showing your potential employer that you are qualified for the position.

Presentation

You want to dress appropriately and professionally for the job interview. It usually won’t hurt to dress more formally for your interview than you would on the job. Show up neat, groomed and on time!

Download directions in advance and leave time for delays like traffic. It is best to show up early, about 5 to 10 minutes before you interview starts. Not only will this show your potential employer that you can arrive on time, but it will also give you time to take a deep breath and relax before the interview starts. You don’t want to appear flustered or out of breath for your first impression.

Give Your Self a Pep Talk

Remember to build yourself up before heading into the interview. Know your self-worth by believing that you are walking into the company to bring value to it with your skill set.

Recite affirmations to yourself on the drive to the interview like “This company could really use someone like me. They would be very lucky to have me.” As much as you want to impress the interviewer, remember that you need to be impressed too. You are not just another people looking for a job…you are you! And there is no one else like you.

Women’s History: The Rise of the Female Entrepreneur

Women’s History Month is a big deal for us at Media Partners. As a women-owned business, we want to see the triumph of female entrepreneurs and businesswomen everywhere. In honor of this historical month, we are spending the entirety of March posting blogs, articles, motivational posts and information centered around women in business and entrepreneurs.

Women’s History Month had its origins as a national celebration in 1981. Congress passed Pub. L. 97-28 which authorized and requested the President to proclaim the week of  March 7, 1982, as “Women’s History Week.” Later, in 1987, Congress designated March the month to celebrate Women’s History for the entire country, after being petitioned by the National Women’s History Project.

 

To show how far women in business have come, here is a look provided by National Women’s History Museum’s online exhibit. To see their full slideshow, click here!

This exhibit defines the term “entrepreneur” to refer to a woman who had an idea for a service or product and started a business of her own. American women have owned businesses as far back as colonial settlements.

Women did not historically use the word “entrepreneur” to describe their businesses until the late 1970s; before that, they called them “sidelines” or part-time projects and understood entrepreneurship to describe what men did.

But looking back, it is clear that women’s business ownership deserves a place in the broader history of entrepreneurship; hence the use of the term in this exhibit.

1910-1939

Up through the nineteenth century, women-owned businesses primarily included taverns and alehouses, millinery and retail shops, hotels, and brothels, and were often operated as a way to provide an income for women who found themselves without a breadwinning man. Business, then, was a way for a woman in potentially dire circumstances to provide for herself rather than become a social burden. 

From 1900 through 1929, Progressivism, feminism, consumerism and immigration all gave rise to a climate that was not only conducive to women’s entrepreneurship but also highly accepting of them. Like many women’s ventures at this time, their primary markets were typically other women, but New Women entrepreneurs often tinged their businesses with a sense of purpose beyond simple economics.

1940-1959 

World War II brought many women into the workforce, filling jobs so men could go off and fight. That same patriotic fervor also inspired many women to consider starting businesses of their own. The Boston Globe’s “women’s pages,” for example, featured Polly Webster’s column, “War Time Wife”, packed with tips for weathering the hardships of the war years—including how to generate income from home-based businesses. 

When World War II ended, women were pushed from wartime jobs for returning soldiers, and many went straight into businesses of their own.

 The Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs and state officials—first in New York and then nationwide—ran workshops for aspiring entrepreneurs with advice from trailblazers such as Elizabeth Arden and male business leaders. There were advice books and free pamphlets. Reader’s Digest included women among the winners of its 1946 competition for best business ideas. The press hailed women entrepreneurs for helping to rebuild the economy by increasing the number of women-owned businesses from 600,000 in 1945 to nearly 1 million by 1950. 

By the 1950s—the age of celebrated domesticity—the home became the new site of, and justification for, starting a business. Everywhere women turned, they received messages that home and family were their primary roles. But the baby boom and an assortment of new consumer goods—from cars to clothes to appliances—also meant that even middle-class families needed more cash. Women stepped up, often capitalizing on homemaking skills to build businesses. They defined their home-based businesses as part of being a good mother. 

1960-1979 

By the early 1960s, the changing social and cultural landscape provided new incentives for would-be women business owners. Divorce rates escalated during the 1960s and single mothers struggling to balance childrearing and their new roles as providers saw in business a possible solution. Women, like beauty maven Mary Kay Ash and advertising executive Mary Wells, started companies of their own as a way to assert their independence in the male world of business. 

The Civil Rights and women’s movements of the 1960s and 1970s brought a new sense of purpose and a language of rights and empowerment to women entrepreneurs. Nonetheless, the result was a change in the way women understood themselves and their ventures, seeking not just to start businesses but to be seen as equals in the world of enterprise.

Feminists founded businesses along movement principles, such as publishing ventures that would give voice to women’s words and perspectives, including the Boston Women’s Health Book Collective, the Feminist Press, and Ms. Magazine. Women entrepreneurs also began to move beyond traditionally female categories and into previously male bastions of technology, metals, and finance.

1980-1999

By the 1980s, the hard work of the previous decades was paying off: women entrepreneurs like Martha Stewart and Vera Bradley…owned 25 percent of all US firms. What’s more, the public and politicians widely acknowledged that women entrepreneurs were a vital component of the nation’s economy. New initiatives, including how-to seminars and government programs, sought to ensure that women had the resources necessary to start and grow their businesses.

In 1988, urged on by the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO), Congress passed The Women’s Business Ownership Act, which ended discrimination in lending, eliminated state laws that required married women to have a husband’s signature for all loans and gave women-owned businesses a chance to compete for lucrative government contracts.

2000-Present Day 

It’s been a bumpy ride for women entrepreneurs in the early 21st century: on the upside, their numbers continue to grow, and Key Bank, Goldman Sachs, and other institutions have increasingly launched financing initiatives targeted solely at would-be women entrepreneurs.

Technological innovation ramped up fast as the 1990s became the 2000s. That not only enabled women entrepreneurs to break into technology-based businesses in record numbers but also to use technology to start, run, promote and accelerate all types of companies. With faster and cheaper Internet, cloud and mobile technologies, women can manage a business from anywhere, with far less startup capital. 

But small and big, women’s ventures came to comprise 30 percent of all U.S. businesses—many of them today in categories that were once men’s alone. The lesson they teach is the power of possibilities and passion for transforming lives.

The next century promises to be even brighter for women’s entrepreneurship. 

 

 

Cold Call Tips and Tricks

Cold calling is challenging, but it doesn’t need to be something that’s feared. Even in a world of ever-evolving technology and multiple ways to contact potential clients, cold calling still remains one of the most cost-effective ways to reach new customers. Like any skill, cold calling takes some time to master.

It involves a lot of preparation, research and evaluating your approach. Thanks to social media and online databases, salespeople have the power to conduct pre-call research and learn important details about a lead before picking up the phone. This is extremely helpful, however, it isn’t the only step to mastering a cold call.

Here are some tips and helpful hints to keep in mind when making contact with potential customers:

Attitude is Everything

Your attitude affects all areas of your life. Even sales. Before you pick up the phone, you need to have the right attitude. Give yourself a pep talk. Stand up tall and make the call.

Be Persistent

You’ve got to be willing to keep calling people back again and again until you reach them and they are willing to speak with you. Adopt a mentality that won’t quit. The prospect will see (or hear rather) your dedication and commitment and could be more receptive to your call.

Believe in Your Product

At the risk of sounding robotic or unconvincing, you need to believe in the product you are selling. Your passion will come through in your voice and can be contagious to whomever you are speaking to. You also have to believe that your product has the best value. Convince yourself that even if your price tag is higher than the competitors, it is still the best value. If you convince yourself and tailor your pitch accordingly, you can convince your prospect as well.

Respect Your Prospects

Treat everyone with respect. After multiple calls in a row and a number of rejects, it can be difficult to keep your morale up. However, you need to start fresh with every call and treat each new prospect with respect and as if it is your first call of the day. Respect goes a long way!

Diversify

Never depend on one call. As Grant Cardone says from InsideSales.com, “Disappointment and rejection are not emotions, they’re indications that your model is broken and you don’t have enough business going on.” So don’t put all your eggs in one basket. You need a lot of calls to be successful. Don’t give up!

 

How Being a Good Listener Can Help Your Business

As Greek philosopher, Epictetus once said, “We have two ears and one mouth so we can listen twice as much as we speak.” This sounds like something your mother may have said to you as a child when you were too busy back talking instead of doing what she said.

However, with this logic -either Epictetus or your mother’s- good listening can affect every aspect of your life, even business.

Research shows that the average person listens at only about 25% efficiency. While most people agree that listening is a very important skill, most don’t take the time to improve their own skill set. We might focus on the mechanics such as nodding or eye contact, but a truly good listener goes beyond that.

Since the purpose of marketing and advertising is to influence peoples’ perceptions and behavior, good listening should be at the forefront of business skills to master.

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Why Listening is Important

Most companies try to listen to their customers as they are invested in their customer’s satisfaction. But are they understanding their customers?

Listening is more than the ability to hear what people say. It’s about being curious and contemplating someone’s desires and motivations. Empathy plays a huge role here.  In order to truly get a grasp of what your customers want, you need to able to put yourself in their shoes and be able to narrow down their incentives. Recognize that your customer has human feeling and emotions.

This capability is essential for marketing professionals who want to create messages people will notice, like, care about and remember when making a purchasing decision.

You can notice the ones that miss the mark. The ads feel strained or fake or the message fails to engage the audience.

Don’t let an ad fail due to simple miscommunication. Listen with full attention and implement your ability to understand.

Listening contributes to a personal connection between you and your customer. It also creates openness. If you are focused on listening to your customer instead of speaking as much as you can, there will be room for new ideas and brainstorming. Their authentic brand or ideas will be able to shine through.

So what is your next step?

Here is a list of 10 Tips for Being a Better Listener by Gianfanga Marketing Strategy that we found particularly helpful, and hopefully you will too:

1. Take the time. Marketing is a fast-paced business and there’s huge pressure to create campaigns and strategies quickly. But if you really want to succeed, you need to build in the time and budget up front to gather input from the client, customer, and prospect

2. Listen to the right people. Talk with the people you’re actually targeting with marketing – customers and prospects – not just your marketing colleagues or people like you.

3. Learn the lingo. If you want prospects to relate to your marketing messages, you need to know the terms and phrases they use when talking about their needs and your product.

4. Delve deeper. Go beyond the obvious questions (“Are you satisfied with our product or service?”) to more probing queries that help you understand the motivations that drive behavior. Make questions open-ended so people can use their own words.

5. Feel the emotion. How do people feel about your company and themselves when they use the products or services you provide? Do they feel confident, happy, pretty, smart, safe? Listen for the emotions underlying the purchasing decision.

6. Listen with your eyes and ears. People reveal a great deal with their body language when they talk. They lean in, make direct eye contact, and use their hands to emphasize their points. Watch carefully and notice the details; see what makes their eyes light up.

7. Don’t be judgmental. Be impartial and neutral when listening. Remove your own biases. It’s not about what you think – it’s about what they think.

8. Avoid stereotypes. Don’t assume you know what someone is thinking because they are young, old, male, female, married, single, a high school dropout, or a Ph.D. Making assumptions based on stereotypes or demographics is a common mistake.

9. Take careful notes. Relying on your memory can be dangerous, even if you’re under 30. It’s too easy to remember what you think someone said, not what they actually said. Record and transcribe the discussions. Focus groups always should be recorded for the marketing team.

10. Reflect on what you’ve heard. Think about the totality of the discussion afterward. What was the customer or prospect really telling you? What stands out most in your mind? What do they truly care about? This is what you need to know to create marketing campaigns and content that engage people on a human level.

U.S. Presidents Who Started as Entrepreneurs

President’s Day was created in 1879 and first celebrated the following year. It was originally intended to honor and celebrate the life and achievements of the “Father of the Country,” George Washington. Now, we commemorate all past US presidents, and in particular Washington, Abraham Lincoln and Thomas Jefferson. Originally held on Washington’s actual birthday (February 22), it was changed in 1971 to the third Monday of February. It was also the first federal holiday to be created in honor of an American citizen.

Today, most are probably just happy for the day off. However, there is a lot we can learn from these past leaders. There are actually a number of former U.S. Presidents who started as business owners and entrepreneurs.

1. Harry Truman

After serving in World War I, Turman opened a men’s clothing store with friend Eddie Johnson upon returning home to Kansas City. It is said that the saying “clothes make the man” could have been coined by Truman. The store was open from 1919 to 1922 but eventually fell victim to the post-war recession. Truman found himself just barely escaping bankruptcy, however, he managed to eventually pay off all his debts.

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2. Franklin D. Roosevelt

Roosevelt founded the Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehabilitation in 1927. As a sufferer of polio, he raised funds to turn a spa into a for-profit healing center for victims of polio. Still operating today, the Warm Springs, the Georgia-based institute serves about 4,000 people with all types of disabilities each year.

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3. Abraham Lincoln

The only U.S. president to receive a patent, Lincoln invented a device to lift riverboats over sandbars. In 1833, he opened a general store with partner William, Berry. Even though the business folded within a year and Lincoln’s possessions seized by the sheriff, Lincoln didn’t quit. He went on to own a law practice, becoming a symbol of perseverance, for his resilience even in hard times.

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4. Warren G. Harding

In 1884, when Harding was 19, he and several partners purchased a small, struggling newspaper in Ohio called The Marion Star. The newspaper became quite profitable, thanks to his wife Florence who helped manage the business operations of the newspaper. The newspaper eventually provided Harding with the income needed to fund his campaigns for public office.

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5. Herbert Hoover

Hoover launched his own mine engineering business in 1908. His company employed 175,000 workers and specialized in reorganizing failing companies, as well as sought new mining prospects and finding investors to pay for developing the best mines.

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6. Jimmy Carter

After Carter’s father died in 1953, the family farm was in danger of being lost. Carter ended up leaving the Navy that same year and returned to Plains, GA to run the peanut farm. With hard work and dedication, he eventually expanded the Golden Peanut Company by 1959, into an international business with multiple warehouses and a peanut-shelling plant.

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7. George Bush

In 1951,  Bush started the Bush-Overby Oil Development company with his neighbor John Overby, after graduating Yale. By 1953, Bush-Overby had merged with another independent oil company to form Zapata Petroleum, which would later make him a millionaire. By 1959, Bush moved to Houston to become the president of Zapata Offshore.

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Why We Love Long Beach

Home to celebrities like Cameron Diaz and Snoop Dogg, as well as famous landmarks like The Queen Mary and Long Beach Naval Shipyards, Long Beach is also home to us, here at Media Partners Worldwide. Since today is a celebration of love, here are a few of the reasons why we love Long Beach!

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Diversity

The city of Long Beach is one of the most diverse large cities in the United States!

Green community

There are an incredible number of parks, hiking paths, greenways, community gardens, skate parks and bike paths. The LBC Parks, Rec & Marine department covers a wide range of activities and clubs available in the city.

There is also a Farmer’s Markets running pretty much every day somewhere in Long Beach. I live only a short walk from the Tuesday and Saturday market in Bixby Park (also famous for its skate park). As an East Coast native and newcomer to Long Beach, I found the accessibility to fresh fruits and vegetables on a regular basis to be a welcomed surprise!

Entertainment

Our CEO, Natalie Hale, loves the many different restaurants Long Beach has to offer. “I love all the variety…from Tantalums to Brix, Panama Joe’s to Gladstones.”

Long Beach also houses a beautiful Aquarium of the Pacific, as well as many museums and historic landmarks. The Pike, conveniently located next to the Long Beach Convention Center, is full of restaurants, shops and more activities like a Ferris wheel, arcade and comedy club.

And since Long Beach is so walk and bike friendly, it is easy to get around and see all the beautiful beaches throughout the city. “The beach area has so much to offer from family fun time to a great place for fitness activities, to a great variety of foods and drinks. You can even just relax listening to the waves and watching the birds fly around,” said one of media strategist.

Many people live without a car with ease, including myself. Between the various bike paths and bike-friendly street lanes, I find getting around fun and easy. I actually ride my bike to and from work daily.

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Dog-Friendly

Long Beach is extremely dog-friendly. Dog are allowed on many restaurant patios and you will often find water bowls for dogs outside of many storefronts. There are several dog parks and a dog beach, including popular Rosie’s Dog Park. LBC also has dog parades and fashion shows throughout the year.

Home

Many of us here at Media Partners, not only work in Long Beach, but we call it home too. “It’s close to the water, yet still affordable and growing more beautiful each year,” said Natalie Hale.

Betty Long in Accounting says she loves the Long Beach Transit System. “I can get all around town without a car. No fuss …take the bus!”

 

We are fortunate that we love the city that we work in! From all of us at Media Partners, have a Happy Valentines Day!

 

 

6 Traits of Successful Entrepreneurs

This week, Media Partners Worldwide celebrates 20 years of business! We wouldn’t have the success we have obtained today without the passion and dedication of our CEO and staff.

Success is an objective word, as we all measure accomplishment differently. However, when speaking of business, the word entrepreneur usually evokes images of the ultimate type of success. How do entrepreneurs do it, you ask?

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While we are not all born geniuses or extroverts or overachievers, that does not mean we are doomed to mediocrity. Some of the most famous of entrepreneurs, like Bill Gates, didn’t even make it through college. So while there is no foolproof guide to entrepreneurial greatness, here are six common personality traits that entrepreneurs possess.

1. Passion

First things first, entrepreneurs have a clear visual of what they want. Not just a fainted hearted wish, but an unshakable sense of purpose. They are driven by their heart, not by the chase for the dollar. No matter how bad it gets, it’s their passion that motivates them between ups and downs and all the times when everyone else tells them to quit. Envision your end goal, see yourself in the position you want to be and do it with passion.

“Your work is to discover your work and then with all your heart to give yourself to it.” 
- Buddha

2. Self-Confidence

There are going to many, many moments in your journey where not a single person will believe in you or your mission. Therefore, you have to believe in yourself. Self-confidence is key if you want to achieve success. Entrepreneurs don’t think that their idea could be good. They know it’s good. While they also understand that they can’t do everything on their own, they realize that they are the only ones to make their idea a reality.

“It is only necessary to have courage, for strength without self-confidence is useless.” – Giacomo Casanova

3. Resilience

As an entrepreneur, there are going to be many failures. That is inevitable. While most people give up, an entrepreneur has the extraordinary ability to bounce back. Instead of giving up, an entrepreneur will learn from their failures. They will as themselves what went wrong, or how can they learn from their mistakes. If you understand that failure is part of being an entrepreneur, you will take those failures and use them as learning experiences. Entrepreneurs don’t stay down for long. They’re resilient and thrive off the chance to do better.

“Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm.” – Winston Churchill 

4. An Appetite for Knowledge

In the world of business, there will always be competition. Entrepreneurs know they need to say ahead and constantly be learning about what is new in their field. You will always have competitors breathing down your neck trying to surpass you. There will always be someone claiming to be the next greatest thing. Staying up to date and sharp, through constant learning, enable them to stay ahead and avoid getting passed. Do everything you can to keep learning and absorb new information, whether it be getting up early to read industry news or making a point to read in your spare time. Remember, knowledge is power!

“Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself”. -John Dewy 

 5. Vision

In a way, entrepreneurs can see the future before it happens. They have the vision, clear as day, in their mind. They see opportunity everywhere and are constantly on the look out to develop or improve new or existing ideas. This is what makes them leaders of their industry. Chances are they started their business because they noticed something that could be better and formed their ideas into action. Have a clear image of what you want to achieve and make it happen.

“In order to carry a positive action, we must develop here a positive vision.” -Dalai Lama

6. Adaptability/Flexibility

There are surprises at every corner in business, and in everyday life. Even with a well-thought out plan or strategy, things don’t always go according to plan. Entrepreneurs are adaptable, giving them the ability to respond quickly in any situation. This allows them to make decisions that can navigate them out of potential trouble.

Having this level of flexibility is crucial for any business.  In fact, most entrepreneurs will tell you that their idea or business plan is drastically different than when it began. Sometimes the reality of a great idea isn’t effective. Entrepreneurs are flexible enough to understand this. They are prepared to make changes to their plan when necessary.

“You must always be able to predict what’s next and then have the flexibility to evolve.” – Marc Benioff

 

 

Tips for Marketing to the Millennial Generation

Millennials are a popular topic of conversation. Whether discussing how much you hate or love them, the internet is abuzz with talk of Generation Y. But despite the negativity surrounding this generation, there are currently 80 million Millennials in the U.S. with an annual buying power of over $600 billion.

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Therefore, every marketer should be making this generation a priority.  As a millennial myself, born in 1990, I can attest to understanding our habits, likes, and dislikes. We may be particular and at time unconventional but we are still loyal to brands we love.

According to a Forbes.com and Elite Daily (the voice of Generation Y) collective study, “millennials are highly educated, career-driven, politically progressive and–despite popular belief–do indeed develop strong brand loyalty when presented with quality products and actively engaged by brands.”

With millennials as a driving force in the marketing place, here are a few key tactics geared towards engaging with this super power generation.

1. Authenticity is Essential

According to AdAge, “Millennials are spending an average of 25 hours per week online – and they’re craving content-driven media.” Between searching blogs, websites, YouTube channels and other social media platforms, we are also sharing, liking, tweeting, snapping, forwarding, pinning and commenting our findings, resulting in a huge online community. The content that strongly resounds with millennials is based on what we see value in and trust.

Millennials connect best with people over logos.

For example, blogs. 33% of millennials rely on blogs before they make a purchase, compared to the fewer than 3% who use TV news, magazines, and books. While the older generations rely on traditional media,  millennials look to social media for an authentic look at what’s going on in the world, especially content written by their peers. Despite the fact that blogs are usually run by an individual rather than corporations, millennials trust the blogger’s opinions. We use bloggers as a kind of adviser to help us make a purchasing decision.

Same with social media platforms like YouTube. I know for myself if I am interested in buying any new product or experimenting with a new brand, I first seek out reviews on YouTube. I have access to these reviews anywhere I go on my smartphone and I like the casualness of hearing someone speak candidly about something they do or do not like. Just like you would seek advice from a friend or family member, I can do that with strangers who share my interests on my social networks.

84 percent of Millennials say user-generated content has at least some influence on what they buy, and 73 percent say it’s important to read others’ opinions before purchasing.

Advertisers, therefore, need to find a way to incorporate this information into their campaigns. For brands that want to successfully reach Gen Y-ers, they need to speak our language. Meaning, they need to create content that we will proudly share, like, pin, tweet, snap, and forward to others. That way the can build a real, authentic brand-customer relationship.

2. We Want an Experience

We millennials prefer experiences over possessions. We are more interested in brands that can show us how to improve our lives, rather than brands that are pushy with selling to us.  In an age of growing minimalist and the environmentally conscience, this is particularly important. To us, possessions come and go, but experiences can resonate forever. Advertisers need to ask themselves how their brand can contribute to an overall experience for millennials.

This is where inbound marketing strategies come into play. Millennials want e-books, blog posts, videos, and other how-to information. This is your company’s chance to provide content that ranks high in Google and shows us you know what you are talking about. Millennials are 44% more likely to trust experts. But they are 247% more likely to be influenced by blogs or social networking sites.

Home Depot is an example of a company who is currently killing it with this marketing strategy. Here is their YouTube channel.

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As you can see, there are a number of how-to videos and home improvement DIYs. Not only can you buy all that you need at Home Depot, but you can learn how to install, build and be inspired all the while they are marketing themselves. Their brand and videos will continuously pop up in web searches. With over 100,000 subscribers, Home Depot’s YouTube channel is clearly ranking on Google searches with inquiries about home and garden projects.

By utilizing millennials favorite social media platforms, you can create shareable content and keep up your authenticity and trust.

 

3. Stay Relevant

Trends come and go. We all know that. However, staying on top of what is trending can help your brand, significantly, especially with hashtags and ranking in Google.

Another great brand that is reaching out perfectly to Millennials is Netflix. “While Netflix has a lot of different customers spanning different generations, Millennials are vital to this company. One way that Netflix reaches out to this generation is by having great social media campaigns and linking up Netflix accounts with Facebook. Netflix is constantly on the watch when it comes to this generation because they want to make sure they keep reaching out perfectly. Studies show 75% of millennials with connected televisions are using them to watch Netflix.”

Here is an example of on of their past advertisements.

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They took a popular hashtag about their company, used for more comedic purposes and meme creation, to target their younger generation audience. Now they are part of the trending conversation and staying relevant.

4. Collaboration

Along with wanting an experience, millennials are interested in having a say.  In fact, 42 percent said they are interested in helping companies develop future products and services. They want to be more involved with how products get created. According to aforementioned Forbes.com and Elite Daily (the voice of Generation Y) collective study, “companies that enable them to be part of the product development process will be more successful. Marketers need to focus on building relationships with consumers by fueling their self-expression and helping them establish their own personal brand.”

Here is an example provided by Hub Spot writer Meaghan Moras: “Coca-Cola used online co-creation to gather expressions of its brand promise “Energizing refreshment.” They prompted their audience to unleash their creativity by interpreting Coca-Cola as an energizing refreshment in whatever style or format they wished. Coca-Cola gathered these videos, animations, illustrations, and photographs to use in its marketing campaigns worldwide. This method was mutually beneficially in that Millennials all over the world got to pour a bit of themselves into a product made for them while helping Coca-Cola bring fresh authenticity to the market.”

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5. Communication and Connection

Staying engaged with the millennial generation is very important. This includes commenting on social media posts, posting consistently, and giving us the impression that each customer is important. A great example of how to do this is through giveaways, special discounts, contests, and loyalty programs. A platform we haven’t discussed much yet is Instagram. According to the Huffington Post, “The visual platform has been rapidly growing and now boasts 300 million monthly active users, with 41% being aged 16-24 and at 35% are in their 24-34s.” These numbers show that your brand needs to be engaging with us through this app. The most successful of brands that use Instagram feature photos regularly (have I mentioned how important consistency is?)and dedicate hashtags. They post pictures on their page that their followers have tagged them in. They invite popular Instagrammers to take over their page to keep their brand fresh and new. We millennials are definitely flattered when a brand we love acknowledges us. I know for myself, I have tagged brands in some of my personal Instagram posts and even a “like” back makes me feel special.

Finding ways to boost engagement will do nothing but improve your chances as being noticed by the trendsetting generation.

Wrap Up

Find the authenticity of your brand and run with it.

Stop screaming “buy!” and start yelling” We have an experience for you!”

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Consistency. Engagement. Connection.

Mobile Marketing Media: Changing Radio Effectiveness?

As effective as radio is, there are still some obstacles in regards to consumer response. In some cases, when hearing an advertisement, potential customers can’t write down the number or remember it later. Texting laws are also limiting customer’s abilities to type on their phones while driving.

#250 Mobile media Marketing#250, a mobile speed dialing service, is providing an easier response method that is hoping to capture more leads for your advertisement. According to their website, “#250 (pound two-fifty) is a speed dial that works right now on virtually all mobile phones in the US and Canada.  Advertisers use it as a replacement for long phone numbers that consumers cannot remember when heard in Radio or TV ads.”

This form of mobile media marketing is extremely effective, as it requires simply remembering a keyword, instead of a whole slew of numbers. By punching in just 4 digits (#250) and stating the keyword mentioned in the advertisement, consumers will be directed right to the business’ call center, website or retail page.  It is also Bluetooth friendly, so you can say the keyword and are connected immediately. Hands free, being the safest driving option, is a huge part of #250’s campaign.

So far, the response has been excellent.

KC Campbell, Western Region Affiliate, said that “clients in LA have seen as much as an 86% increase in their calls in the first month.” Some companies have had to staff up to handle the call volume.

Businesses can choose their own keywords as well. This factor is “unique to each individual client,” said Campbell. So instead of hearing an ad on TV or radio that prompts you to call “1-800-GET-THIN,” customers simply dial #250 and say the keyword “Get Thin.”

And as far as performance tracking, they have that covered too.

“We can see we got “x” amount of calls and there is empirical proof of it because we have the numbers and times that these calls went through.” This allows data to be very specific, as you can see the duration of the call or if a text message was accepted.

Mobile marketing media, like #250, has a great possibility of making radio work more efficiently. With more response options and an easier method of remembering your product, consumers will most likely be responding faster and in greater volumes.

That is the main goal, anyway.

Writing Radio Ads that Work

Bad writing can mean the death of your radio campaign.writing

Because the power of radio relies so heavily on the quality of the copy, it is in your best interest to find a writer who recognizes this medium and understands how to target your specific audience.

Here are some tips for writing ads that will work and generate sales.

1. When Hiring a Writer

The best writers are those with broadcast experience. Radio relies on skill and salesmanship so you need someone who has an understanding of  direct response marketing. You also need to be willing to spend some money, as good writers aren’t cheap.

When hiring a writer, remember to let them write. Good writers will listen to you, but they will also do what is necessary to create the best ad to sell your product. Don’t get in their way and take over the project. Let them do what you hired them for.

2. Timing

Most radio spots are broken up into 30 second or 60 second segments. 60 seconds gives you twice the amount of time to get listeners attention. 30 seconds are usually good for well known products or a simply offer. We typically advocate for a 60 second commercial, as you need to mention the phone number or call to action, such as go to your website, at least three times. A 30 second advertisement is usually too short to include everything you need.

3. Call Now!

Since the main focus of direct response advertisement is to make the phone ring with inquiries, everything in the spot should prompt the listener to pick up the phone and call. Offer free consultations, free information or limited time offers to instill a sense of urgency in the customer. You want them to ACT NOW.

4. Selling Comes First

When you only have 60 seconds to work with, every single second counts. Get the listeners attention, make an offer and generate a response. That is your objective.  A good way to test if your ad is concise enough, remove the product from the copy. If you still have a complete concept, then your ad isn’t selling. The product, website, offer, phone number or selling idea should make up the entire spot.

5. Know Your Audience

This is key in any form of advertising. With radio, you have two options: Talk Radio and Music Radio.

With Talk Radio, your audience is ready to listen. Catching the listeners attention or blending into the surrounding talk are two ways to infiltrate talk radio. You want to encourage further listening.

With music radio, your ad will be an interruption. Your spot must peak the listeners interest before they can change the station.

6. Choose a Creative Format

There isn’t a set way to write a radio ad, however, here are a few creative formats that have been proven to work and get your listeners calling.

Straight Announcer- With a clear, straightforward copy and a strong, direct voice, nothing could be simpler for your ad. The announcer should speak as if addressing one single person. Asking questions such as “Have you ever…?” or “Wouldn’t you like…?” helps create a personal connection with the listener and makes the ad feel less like a lecture. With the right voice, this effortless approach can pull listeners in quickly.

Dialog – A typical example of this type of format, involves two people conversing with one another. One person is excited about a product or service and wants to share this information with the other person, who knows nothing about it. That person asks questions, while the other relays the information, thus divulging your product or services main information. If you have voices that match your demographic, speaking in a believable way, then this ad will come across as a testimony or referral, which is great for business.

Person on the Street– Asking real people what they think of your product is a great attention grabber. Get the person you are talking to on the street to describe how the product worked in their own words, or how it benefited them. Ask if they would recommended this product to others. Listeners will hear real people giving their true opinions and this will act as a testimony to your product. You can take this one step further by having the person on the street address the audience directly. Add in a celebrity endorsement or an experts opinion works great as well.

Vignette– This creative format, starts off with a short life scene exhibiting a problem. Then it cuts to the announcer who will describe your product as the solution. Time permitting, the life scene will continue, this time to show how your product has made their life easier. Make sure to return to the announcer to end the spot with a call to action and your 800 number.

7. Establish name identification early and often

Give the name of your company, service or product early in the spot. Since you only have 60 seconds, you want to establish everything your listener needs to know about your business as quickly and efficiently as possible. Repeat this information at least three times throughout the ad.

8. Use a memorable or relevant 800 number

Most radio isn’t interactive, like podcasts and apps like Pandora where you can click to call or purchase right from your phone. Most listeners are in the car or at work when they hear your ad. Therefore, they need to be able to remember your phone number if a phone isn’t within their reach.  A special 800 number relevant to your product, is very helpful.

9. Call to Action

Answer the question that listeners might have: “What do you want me to do right now?” Of course, you want them to call! Don’t be subtle about it either. For example, the announcer could say, “For a free brochure on how to get rid of extra weight fast, call 1-800-LOSE-FAT.”

10. Limited Time Offers

People respond well to limited time offers. It provokes a sense of urgency and urges a call to action. People don’t like to miss out on good deals. Establishing a deadline forces an immediate response.

I hope you found these tips for writing radio advertisements helpful! For more information, call us at 800-579-3031.